Archive for the ‘ProFirstAid’ Category

BLS vs CPR… What’s the Difference?

Have you ever applied for a job that required BLS certification?

“I’m CPR certified,” you say. “But does that count? Am I qualified?”

Sound familiar?…

I get a lot of questions about the difference between BLS and CPR. So, I thought I would take a second to delve into this on a deeper level.

I spoke with our Training and Compliance Manager, Jody Marvin, concerning the topic and this is what he had to say:

“There is no difference between BLS and CPR,” he said.  “BLS is an abbreviation for Basic Life Support. It is simply another term for CPR and leans towards meaning healthcare provider level.”

“But what about when people are doing research online and find comments that seem to suggest it is a different certification?” I asked.

“Most often, when a person is searching online or asking about a BLS certification, they mean Healthcare Provider level CPR,” Jody explained.  “However, BLS is a generic term for any form of CPR. This is especially the case in other countries, like the UK. Basic life support refers to maintaining an open airway and supporting breathing and circulation without the use of equipment other than a protective device.”

“So, then if it’s the same, why is there still so much confusion about the terms?” I asked him.

“Where confusion comes from is that the term BLS has traditionally been associated with Healthcare Provider level CPR,” he answered. “The American Heart Association certification for healthcare providers is titled, “BLS for Healthcare Providers”. Our equivalent certification is “ProCPR.” The American Red Cross equivalent certification is called “CPR for the Professional Rescuer and Healthcare Providers. Years ago, the American Heart Association term was BCLS (Basic Cardiac Life Support), or BLS level C.”

“Okay, so it’s just because of the difference in terminology which makes it seem more complicated then it really is?” I ventured.

“Not quite,” Jody responded. “The real issue is not about the term BLS. Rather, it is about getting to the root of what course content the person needs in order to determine which level of CPR a person needs. For example, healthcare providers need ProCPR (Healthcare provider Adult/Child/Infant CPR/AED level), teachers and daycare providers need ProFirstAid (Lay rescuer Adult/Child/Infant CPR/AED level), general workplace people need ProFirstAid Basic or ProCPR Basic (Lay rescuer Adult CPR/AED level).”

“Ah, okay. Got it. Thanks so much, Jody!”

For more information on all the courses we offer, please visit procpr.org.

Are Hospitals Banning New CPR Certification Technology?

“I’d love to use flexible, online CPR certification, but my boss told me it is our policy not to allow online CPR certifications. What am I supposed to do?”

Reports of certain hospitals preventing the use of technology to complete ongoing education and credentialing may be causing confusion regarding the validity of accredited, blended e-learning solutions. While extremely busy nurses and other health care professionals are being encouraged to find more efficient ways to complete their daily tasks, they are being prevented, or in some cases even suspended, for finding affordable and time saving ways for validating their credentials. Even though it is being encouraged by organizations such as the American Heart Association [1], e-learning is still forbidden by many hospital policies.

One of the most scrutinized credentials currently being affected by these stringent policies is Basic Life Support certification (BLS or BCLS). In the past, the only way to certify or renew certification was to attend a 4 or 8 hour classroom course with an instructor. Problems with this method of CPR certification include extended time without review between certifications and low retention of skills resulting from too much information in one sitting.

This skill retention problem began to be addressed with the concept of self-paced e-learning solutions in late 2005. Video-based e-learning allows students to learn at their own speed and schedule, and at a time that is convenient for them. Additionally, e-learning programs such as those provided by ProTrainings offer students weekly refresher emails to keep their rescue skills fresh throughout the year. Despite these advantages, some CPR instructors, practitioners, and health care administrators hold to the belief that the only accredited and acceptable certification is one that is provided in a classroom format. A popular reason for this stance is the unfounded belief that online training is inherently not as effective as classroom training [2].

As an illustration of this viewpoint, one Nurse Practitioner educational program responds to the question, “What type of CPR certification is needed for the School of Nursing, where can we get certified, and when do we have to obtain the certification?” And the answer — “The Basic Life Support for HealthCare Providers Course covering the adult, infant, child, and two man CPR (Hospital Level Provider-2 year) is required. All BSN students must complete CPR classes prior to enrollment. Documentation (copy of CPR card) must be presented at orientation. Classes may be taken through the American Heart Association or the Red Cross. Online courses are not acceptable.” (http://son.utmb.edu/programsofstudy/fnp/faqs.cfm)

This type of response doesn’t make things look very hopeful for online CPR training acceptance or adoption. However, as technology develops and online CPR training and certification become more convenient and more time efficient, I wonder whether those hospitals with classroom-only policies will eventually need to allow online certification to stay competitive. If the rate of technology keeps moving as swiftly as it is, I believe the answer is a resounding, “Yes.”

In the meantime, ProTrainings continues to work with progressive organizations that see the value in self-paced e-learning for their staff. And I continue look forward to the day when hospitals decide to trust their hardworking nurses and healthcare practitioners enough to allow them the freedom to choose who they use for their training and certification.

 

 

1 “The American Heart Association’s BLS for Healthcare Providers Online Part 1 Course, Web-based and accessible 24 hours a day, provides a flexible alternative to classroom training. Through case-based scenarios, interactive activities and videos, this course teaches the concepts of both single-rescuer and team basic life support.”
(http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/CPRAndECC/HealthcareTraining/BasicLifeSupportBLS/BLS-for-Healthcare-Providers-Online-Part-1_UCM_303473_Article.jsp)

 

2 Numerous studies have been conducted to measure the effectiveness of CPR taught through video-based and e-learning methods versus classroom methods. Several such studies include:

Todd KH, Braslow A, Brennan RT, Lowery DW, Cox RJ, Lipscomb LE, Kellermann AL: Randomized, controlled trial of video self-instruction versus traditional CPR training. Ann Emerg Med March 1998;31:364-369.

Todd KH, Heron SL, Thompson M, Dennis R, O’Connor J, Kellermann AL: Simple CPR: A randomized, controlled trial of video self-instructional cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in an African American church congregation. Ann Emerg Med December 1999;34:730-737.

Lynch B, Einspruch EL, Nichol G, Becker LB, Aufderheide TP, Idris A: Effectiveness of a 30-min CPR self-instruction program for lay responders: a controlled randomized study. Resuscitation. 2005 Oct;67(1):31-43.

Reder S, Cummings P, Quan L: Comparison of three instructional methods for teaching cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of an automatic external defibrillator to high school students. Resuscitation. 2006 Jun;69(3):443-53. Epub 2006 May 5.

Mutts with a Mission

“What’s your opinion on the best behaved dog?” Tina asked

“The one who spends a lot of time with its owner,” he answered.

Tina, one of our lovely live chat consultants, told me about an organization she heard about today while chatting with one of our customers. He was looking for CPR and First Aid certification, because he teaches dog training classes with an organization called Mutts with a Mission.

Mutts With A Mission is a non-profit organization founded in late 2008 that is dedicated to training rescue and shelter dogs to assist American Veterans and Wounded Warriors who have physical and psychological disabilities so that they may once again regain their independence and freedom.

“This organization was founded because of the overwhelming number of soldiers who have sacrificed to keep our great country free.  The number of soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with life altering injuries is staggering and we want to help these incredible individuals. We also include anyone having served on Active Duty both Stateside and Overseas. Having served in the military ourselves we want to help our fellow Veterans and Wounded Warriors.  This is our way of saying THANK YOU!!!!!” their website reads.

For more information on  what they are doing and how to get involved, go to http://www.muttswithamission.com/

We’re so excited to partner with such a noteworthy organization. Thanks so much for choosing to work with us. And thank you for all the great work you are doing to serve those who serve our country. THANK YOU!

New website, new courses, new features, oh my!

We’re very excited about the launch of our newly redesigned corporate website — take a look at www.protrainings.com. Check out all the great programs and exciting things we have to offer, including several new courses:

Healthcare ergonomics: OSHA compliant training for safely lifting and moving people

Workplace ergonomics: OSHA compliant training for lifting and moving objects

ProCPR Basic: Adult CPR and AED training

ProFirstAid Only: Only First Aid training

ProHazcom: Hazcom right to know

We are always working hard to create and offer courses that would best meet your needs and requirements. Please let us know if there’s a specific course that we do not currently offer but that you think would be helpful if we did.

Feel free to comment on this blog post or connect with us on facebook or twitter.  You may also contact us via email, live chat, phone or mail.

We look forward to hearing from you soon.

Cheers!

 

Isn’t Online CPR Certification an Oxymoron?

I was spending some time on Twitter recently when I saw a message that caught me off guard. It read, “Isn’t online CPR certification an oxymoron?” As the co-founder of a company that provides online CPR certification, I have become accustomed to defending our business and explaining why online training is a better way to learn. But the way this statement was phrased really resonated with me as a concise and witty explanation of how many people feel about our company. Why is it that the phrase “online CPR” appears to be in contradiction with itself — in fact, even humorous or absurd? I felt compelled to answer this question.

The answer is very simple and it explains why people so quickly dismiss online CPR as a viable training option. For anyone who has taken a classroom CPR course, the most memorable part of the course (whether positive or negative) was probably practicing CPR on the dummy. The pressure is on as each student is expected to recall the proper sequence of steps and breathe into the lifeless dummy as other classmates observe. And thus, the obvious problem — “How do I practice CPR on the computer? Do you want me to do chest compression on the mouse? How absurd!”

So, as it turns out, people don’t really have a problem with the CPR training itself being video-based and delivered online. This method of training is fine. In fact, self-paced video training you can pause and rewind is arguably better than an instructor you can’t rewind. The problem with learning CPR online (as classroom CPR courses have taught us) is that you can’t learn how to do CPR unless you practice it on a dummy. And hands-on practice is clearly impossible with an online course… Right?

No, not exactly. But don’t worry. I’m not about to suggest that practicing CPR on your mouse is a viable option either. A popular buzzword right now in education is blended learning, and I predict that you will continue to hear more about it as e-learning gains in popularity. With blended learning, there are two components to the training process — an online portion and an in-person (or hands-on) portion. This blended model works perfectly for CPR — watch the training videos and take the test online, then meet one-on-one with a qualified skill evaluator who will verify your CPR skills. Now you can learn CPR online without sacrificing the best part of the class — manikin practice!

Now that manikin practice can be blended with an online CPR course, I could safely end this article with the conclusion that online CPR certification is not necessarily an oxymoron (and that everyone should take a blended CPR course right now at ProCPR.org to prove it to themselves). However, let’s take this argument one step further and look at the initial assumption that began all this. Is it really true that all CPR classes must include manikin practice in order to be valid? I know that’s the way it has always been, but take a minute to really think about it.

Think about the EMT who performs CPR nearly every day and is being asked to perform CPR on a dummy every two years to prove that he knows how CPR works (incidentally, ask anyone who has ever performed CPR on a real person if it is anything like practicing on a dummy and you will find out just how unrealistic the practice really is). Think for a moment about the recent push to encourage hands-only CPR for lay rescuers. The motivation behind this whole movement is that not enough people are willing to get involved in an emergency cardiac arrest situation, often because they are afraid they might do something wrong. CPR has been made to seem complicated for so many years that people feel unqualified to try unless they have been certified recently, as if being certified is a special license to rescue. Something is clearly wrong with the way CPR is being taught.

Mandating manikin practice in our CPR classes is not going to solve this problem of getting involved. The fact is, CPR is not a complicated skill that is causing deaths because people are doing it incorrectly. People are dying because CPR is not being done at all. As the co-founder of a company that promotes easily accessible CPR training that reduces people’s fear of performing CPR, I don’t believe that online CPR certification is an oxymoron. I believe it is a better way to learn CPR that will result in more lives being saved, with or without the manikin practice.

The Difference between Lay Rescuer and Professional – Customer Support

There are different types of CPR. The ProCPR certification is a Healthcare Provider level certification. Healthcare Provider means that you will have training in adult, child, and infant CPR/AED for 1 and 2 rescuers. You will learn how to check for a pulse and how to give rescue breathing for a person who has a pulse, but is not breathing. You will also use a bag valve mask and a rescue mask to give ventilation. Healthcare provider CPR is most often required for anyone who is licensed to provide care.

Lay Rescuer CPR is much more simplified. In lay rescuer, you may do adult only CPR/AED or adult, child, and infant CPR/AED. Also, lay rescuers do not check for a pulse. Lay rescuers also only learn 1 person CPR. We offer certification in ProFirstAid (adult, child, infant) and ProFirstAid Basic (adult only). Lay rescuer CPR is most often needed for teachers, construction workers, general workplace, etc.

You most likely will need to do our blended course which includes a hands-on skill evaluation. If your employer will accept a 100% online course for re-certification, you can do that as well at our website. You can go to www.procpr.org to complete your training and certification.

2010 CPR Guideline Training Videos Now Available Here

We worked pretty hard on the training video library.  We spent time re-filming all of the necessary videos to cover the 2010 CPR guideline updates.  The updates apply to our CPR and First Aid training libraries:

ProCPR Training Videos

ProFirstAid Training Videos

ProFirstAid Basic Training Videos

ProFirstAid Advanced Training Videos

It has been a lot of work, but it’s worth it to make sure you’re all well trained and up to date.

We’ve also uploaded all of the videos to our YouTube Channel.  If you’d like to subscribe to the channel, we do add new videos there from time to time.

We hope that you enjoy the training videos.

New 2010 Updates Coming Soon

A lot of you, and I do mean a lot, have been asking about the 2010 updates that have just released.  Some are asking if they should start teaching it immediately, others if the updates have gone into effect yet.

The simple answer is that they haven’t gone into effect yet officially.  New materials have to be created and printed or developed, and that takes time.  I’d look for things to go into effect toward the middle of 2011, with full roll-out by the end of the year.

Like most everyone else, we’re actively working on updating our training modules, and you’re going to start seeing a new video intro on the ones that have been updated.  Here’s a preview of that intro.

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ProFirstAid Advanced Launches

We’re very proud to announce that we have launched our new ProFirstAid Advanced program.  ProFirstAid Advanced is online Pediatric CPR (adult, child, and infant) and First aid certification for the healthcare provider.

If you are currently certified with the Red Cross, AHA, American Safety Council, ASHI or Medic First Aid, you are welcome to utilize the program and receive a new, two-year ProFirstAid Advanced certificate. Blended learning certification with skills test is available.

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Follow ProCPR on Twitter, Fan on Facebook and More

We’re all over social media, here at ProCPR.  In fact, we’ve got many twitter accounts that you can follow, for updates on each of our current programs.  We’d also like to invite you, if you haven’t already, to become a fan on Facebook.  It’s a growing community of all of you that loves keeping your skills fresh with our training videos, and have a great time with the profession of saving lives.  We’ve also got a youtube channel for you to subscribe to.  We’re updating it regularly with new training videos and other fun videos that we come up with to promote life-saving skills.

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